Why Did Hillary Lie About Her Health?

Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign just made a massive error. We’ll know within the next few weeks if the error will prove to be catastrophic.

On Sunday, Clinton abruptly left a Manhattan ceremony marking the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. A video shows her shakily stumbling while trying to get into a van to leave. The candidate’s physician later offered this explanation: Clinton has had an allergy-related cough for some time, and during an examination on Friday, the Democratic nominee was diagnosed with pneumonia, put on antibiotics, and told to take time out to rest. She became overheated and dehydrated during Sunday morning’s event, which led her to collapse. She’s now home in Chappaqua and on the road to recovery.

Compare this timeline to details from Hillary Clinton’s public schedule and behavior over these same two days.

After Clinton was diagnosed with pneumonia and put on antibiotics, she did not, as her physician recommended, take time out to rest. Instead, she attended a fundraiser featuring Barbra Streisand. Then on Sunday morning, she attended the 9/11 commemoration, became “overheated,” and woozily wobbled rather dramatically. Ninety minutes later she exited her daughter Chelsea’s apartment building to tell the press she was “feeling great.” The Secret Service permitted a young girl to come over to give the candidate a hug.

It was only a few hours later when her campaign finally announced that she has pneumonia and is recovering.

The most charitable reading of this timeline is that her campaign — presumably with the blessing and perhaps insistence of the candidate — fully intended to keep her illness a secret from the public. Let’s be clear about what this means: Her campaign intended to lie. Even though doing so would require her to keep up a public schedule that might well make her condition worse and require ever-more elaborate forms of concealment. Because, of course, to curtail her schedule would raise questions that might reveal the truth.

So even after she collapsed, the campaign decided the ruse would continue. It arranged for the candidate to make her curbside declaration of wellness, even bringing on the girl to give her a “spontaneous” hug. (Clinton’s protection detail would never have permitted a genuinely spontaneous embrace on the street, even by a child.)

It’s easy to understand why the Clinton campaign would want to keep this kind of news a secret. The candidate doesn’t trust the media. The right has been hitting her over supposed health issues for months (and even years), and the assault has picked up in intensity over the past week or so — since Clinton found herself in the midst of an extended coughing fit at a campaign event in Cleveland. Then there’s the gender dynamic. Donald Trump presents himself as a hyper-masculine tough guy, while Clinton is the first female presidential nominee. The Clinton camp is probably twice as terrified of their candidate looking frail as a less path-breaking campaign would be.

So the campaign chose to lie. The potential reward was considerable: namely, an absence of politically damaging news stories about Clinton’s medical condition. But the risk was enormous — and it’s blown up in their faces. Because now the story isn’t just that Clinton is ill. It’s that, once again, she’s untrustworthy — and this time about her own health. Read more at The Week

Sal Traina

About The Week

Sal authored & co-authored articles in various political and technology publications, e-newsletters, websites, & blogs. In radio, he wrote a blueprint for successful internet radio programming and station management. Sal has a gained a reputation as a captivating and polarizing digital and print media figure INTERESTS: -Political history, philosophy and libertarian politics -Talk radio and program management -Studying and exposing mainstream media propoganda, corporatism, and pop culture shaping by global elites -Writing about the decline of American culture, the complacency of the masses, and promoting personal responsibility

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